Publications

Publications, Books, Book Chapters and Reviews by Prof. Marcus Maurer, MD

Use: Start with an overview of all publications. Use tag links to list selected documents or to list an entire category, e.g. Original Work, Books, Book Chapters, Reviews. If you know what you are looking for, enter this term in the search field.

Worsening of chronic spontaneous urticaria after intake of hot pepper

Filename 418. Türk et al., Hot pepper, APJAI 2021.pdf
Filesize 196 KB
Version o.418
Date added May 31, 2021
Downloaded 0 times
Category Original Work
Tags capsaicin, chronic spontaneous urticaria, hot pepper, mast cell, sensory nerve
Authors Türk, M., Yilmaz, I., Hawro, T., and Maurer, M.
Citation Türk, M., Yilmaz, I., Hawro, T., and Maurer, M.: Worsening of chronic spontaneous urticaria after intake of hot pepper. Asian Pac. J. Allergy Immunol. 2021: 39; 25-30.
Corresponding authors Maurer, M.
DocNum o.418
DocType PDF
IF TBD (IF 2020: 2.31)
Publisher Asian Pac. J. Allergy Immunol.
ReleaseDate 2021

Background: Patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) have been reported to experience increased disease activity in response to the oral intake of hot pepper (Capsicum spp.). As of now, it is unclear how common this is.

Objective: We assessed patients with CSU for the prevalence of disease worsening after the intake of hot pepper and characterized its effects on their urticaria.

Methods: A questionnaire-based survey study in adult patients with CSU and a history of hot pepper consumption was carried out at a reference center for urticaria in Turkey. CSU patients who had co-existing chronic inducible urticaria were excluded from the study.

Results: Of the eighty-five patients with CSU included in this study, 46% (39 of 85) reported worsening of their urticaria after consuming hot pepper. Demographic features, duration of CSU and control status of urticaria were not different between patients who experienced worsening of their urticaria after the intake of hot pepper and those who did not. In affected patients, worsening of their symptoms started 1.2 ± 1.2 hours after the intake of hot pepper and lasted for 3.3 ± 6.8 hours. Symptoms disappeared significantly faster in patients who took antihistamines after worsening of their urticaria with hot pepper (0.7 ± 0.6 vs. 5.8 ± 8.8 hours; p = 0.003).

Conclusions: Worsening of urticaria is common and relevant in patients with CSU in Turkey. Further studies are needed to explore if this is also the case in other geographical regions and to identify and characterize the underlying mechanisms.

(Last update: 08.2021)

Number of publications (original work and reviews) in peer-reviewed journals: 636
Number of original publications in peer-reviewed journals: 462
Number of reviews in peer-reviewed journals: 174
Cumulative IF of publications (original work & reviews) in peer-reviewed journals: 3834,12
Cumulative IF for original publications in peer-reviewed journals: 3043,14
Cumulative IF for reviews in peer-reviewed journals: 790,98
Citations, Hirsch index: (view on Web of Science) 26429